Tag Archives: nature

“Art is not…” Interview with an Artist, part 4

“Inspired” by Mr. Sadler’s comments below, I’ve found what others have to say what “art is not…”  I open with my friend Pablo and close with some reality:

Art is not the application of a canon of beauty but what the instinct and the brain can conceive beyond any canon. When we love a woman we don’t start measuring her limbs.” ~ Pablo Picasso

Art is not an investment” – VIDEOArne Glimcher, founder of Pace Gallery.

Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.”  ~ Edgar Degas

One of many collections – daughter Samantha @ 7, now 12 years old

“Start by remembering that teaching children about art is not just about showing them how to recognize a van Gogh or Picasso, it’s about preparing young minds for a future of invaluable experiences—art related or otherwise.” by Andrea Mulder-Slater (http://www.kinderart.com/artspeak/important.shtml)

Art is not a luxury.” Fresh Artists (http://www.freshartists.org), a non profit 501(c)(3) organization, created to help save art making in K-12 public schools.

The interviews continue….
Best, Paul
Paul Shampine

Roger Sadler, Temple TX

I am never inspired. Art is work. And I work. Within the process of work I may get excited about an idea and follow it out. Work and ideas. No inspiration: that is a late 19th early/ 20th century concept. Sorry to contradict you but making art is not magic; and inspiration bespeaks of magic. To conclude, art is work and ideas.

When did you first discover your creative talents? 14 years old.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. Selling The Leaving for 600 dollars was my biggest sell and biggest painting and most dear to me. THE LEAVING is not a horror painting despite appearances. It is about pain. The pain of a relationship breaking up and the child being abandoned, or being left with the clan behind the fence. The male is exiting the front of the picture. He is slumped with grief and depression. The women stays behind with the child, holding her hand. The characters are so depressed and in so much pain that “the flesh is stripped from their bones.” The painting is medium large, 5 ft x 5 ft.

The other painting is PURPLE PAINTING. It is an example of my current painting style. My previous painting style was realististic/impressionistic. My present style is abstract. The size is 16 x 20 inches.

Who are your favorite artists? My present (and they change) favorite artists are Brice Marden and Sean Scully.


Artist: Roger Sadler
Title: The Leaving and Purple Painting
Website: http://www.rogersadler.com/

Ruby Farias, Scottsdale, AZ

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was passionate about art as long as I can remember… I loved doing crafts with my mother as a child. In school, I doodled a lot and in high school I think I took every art class that was available. Although in my adult life I took somewhat of a hiatus to work on my “corporate career”, I came full circle in 2001 and reconnected with my passion. It was then that I promised myself that I would never put my brush down again.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. It was my first piece that I sold to someone I didn’t know. It was my first gallery show and I was thrilled to see the tab on the wall announcing to all that “Lavender Morning” was sold. It felt great and I was so happy that someone out there could love a piece of art that I created. It is a great feeling when the public enjoys my work. I want my work is to provide energy and to brighten up ones soul.

Who are your favorite artists? It is the works that are created with somewhat of an abstract technique, bright colors and details that make you wonder what is going on in that piece that attracts me. Of course, there are works done by familiar artists like Monet, Van Gogh, Kahlo, Klee and Matisse that I truly enjoy; not only in their work but in who they were and what their story was.

Artist: Ruby Farias
Title: Nights Magic
Medium: Acrylic, Gel on Canvas, 16″ X 20″
Website: http://www.rubyfariasdesigns.com

Courtney Jacobs, Pleasanton, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? Drawing was one of my earliest ways to play.  My mom told me that my preschool teacher had contacted her out of concern for my “different” drawings…and for the fact that I spent so much of my time drawing.  Painting didn’t come until waaaay later in my teenage years.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I had a large abstract painting (Big Bang) on display at a local theater event.  At the artist reception I was approached by TWO people who were interested in purchasing the painting.  I was completely ecstatic to be in such “demand”, and ended up selling the painting to the first buyer for over $1000 (big bucks for me at the time).  The buyer still comes to a few of my events each year to check out the progress.

Who are your favorite artists? I have become a big fan of Gerhard Richter.  He is so versatile, working between photo-realistic painting, and completely colorful non-figurative painting.  Jackson Pollock‘s action paintings were also a big inspiration for me.

Artist: Courtney Jacobs
Title: Trummerzackam
Medium: Acrylic on panel, 36×60 inches
Website: http://www.courtneyjanejacobs.com/

Patricia Corbett, Wallingford, CT

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was drawing figures, horses, etc. as a child and would win little awards in grammar school. In high school I was known for my art.  But after high school graduation and 3 years of night school, I went back to college majoring in music applied in voice.  My professional career as a singer was very satisfying. 10 years ago I retired from music and rekindled my art career.  It has been very enjoyable.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I sold my first piece of art at Zoe & Floyd Art Gallery in CT.

Who are your favorite artists? Edgar Alwin Payne, Richard Schmidt, Mary Cassatt, John F. Carlson, and Franz A. Bischoff.

Artist: Patricia Corbett
Title: Summertime on the Merritt
Medium: Oil on canvas
Website: http://www.patriciacorbett.blogspot.com/

Eric Valdez, Alhambra, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? I’ve been creative from as far back as I can remember. My earliest memory of doing anything creative is drawing an Easter bunny at a YMCA after school program when I was 5. From then on I kept drawing, but I never considered it a talent. It was just something I did. I still don’t consider my artistic abilities a talent. They’re more like skills that I’ve been honing for over 25 years.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. The first exhibition that I was ever in kind of set a pretty high benchmark for any other group shows that I’ve been a part of because during the opening I sold both of the pieces that I had submitted. I picked up painting in the early 2000s as a hobby and then stopped when my record collecting hobby took over. Getting back into painting a couple years later was dumb luck and becoming a visual artist was something that I had never set out to do, so it was hard for me to wrap my head around the fact that I had sold two paintings in my first show. Those paintings were done to fit into the theme of the show so I didn’t have a personal connection to them beyond the work that I put into them, but having such strong reactions to pieces that I had painted motivated me to keep going.

Who are your favorite artists? One of my biggest influences is Neal Breton (Google him!), my friend and mentor who dragged me kicking and screaming into his studio and gave me the confidence to show my work off. I also really dig Jean-Michel BasquiatBanksyAndy WarholRoy LichtensteinShepard Fairey, and pop art and street art in general. Comic books also have had a huge influence on me and some of my favorite comic book artists are Frank MillerJack KirbyTim SaleBruce TimmJim Steranko and John Romita, Sr..

Artist: Eric Valdez
Title: Vicente Fernandez
Medium: Vinyl, acrylic, spray paint, 18×24 inches
Website: http://ericvaldezart.com/

 




Is it boredom? Do I have ADHD…or something else?

Fire pit...with a twist...

Often when I perform a task, I find myself adding a twist. Even with the ridged parameters of an excel spreadsheet, I’ve found art in numbers with cost analysis and business plans. As a bored teenager, I would create abstract-impressionistic patterns when mowing the lawn, and it doesn’t and won’t stop there. In search of answers, I turn to my genetic line.

My Father was a very creative and innovative engineer who designed intricate conveyor systems that robotically handled the most delicate items to large bulky raw materials that required micro-modifications and delivered from point A to Z with precision and efficiency. My open-minded, care-free, adventurous Mother brings just that to her paintings. She’s a great experimental watercolorist that tests tradition and strives to learn and develop her own voice. Her drive to learn and evolve comes from her Father , a beautiful and simple, but extraordinary complex man with a great soul. In retrospect, I believe he never found his true calling, but he lead a very happy and satisfied life.

I fall squarely in the middle with a slight slant on my Father’s side. I view business challenges with a different perspective and hopefully bring that same innovative and fresh ideology to my sculpture. My career choices have been diverse and I’ve lead a very adventurous life. I think I’ve passed those heritable traits, along with a few others to my daughters.

So, for now, let’s go with what I’ve heard before….”you’re something else.”

My current studio...

As I prepare for my upcoming show, I’m getting away from metal for awhile, but sticking close to nature. As nature struggles to repair itself from our invasive actions, I’ve discovered gravity again as I wrangle an invasive plant (wild grape vines) on the property here in Newtown, CT to construct a series of spheres representing…

Nature vs. Nurture? – Inspiration Part 3

Paul Shampine sculpture sculptor art artist
Photo supplied by my daughter, Isabella Shampine, age 10 - Bronx Zoo

It’s an interesting question as it relates to artistic style, choice, influence, direction and….inspiration.  It’s not my goal to debate this topic, nor do I have any scientific data to support any conclusions, but to what extent is there a heritable component to individual artistic differences?

What direction would Picasso’s daughter Paloma, now a designer for Tiffany & Co., have taken if she was separated at birth?  Did her father’s fame discourage her from becoming one of the next best painters in the world? Would we have experienced another Cubist-like movement?
Or is artistic style a straight act of transforming individual emotions and experiences?
Here are some more “inspiration” essays.  I will publish one more round next week.

Liz Hager,  San Francisco, CA

Paul Shampine sculptor sculpture art artist“My art is inspired by many ideas—historical, philosophical, scientific—and every piece demands its own media and execution. Books, however, have always occupied a special place in my heart, both as aesthetic objects and conduits for ideas. Thus, it was a great honor to be invited to participate in the 2008 exhibit “Banned and Recovered: Artists Respond to Censorship.”

My sculptural piece “Harry Potter & The Fires of Ignorance” was inspired by the fourth Harry Potter book—Harry Potter & The Goblet of Fire. Given the book’s 2001 release date, most likely copies of the Goblet of Fire were those burned in March 2001 in the first such protest incident; a small evangelical group in Pittsburgh had taken offense at the book’s portrayal of witchcraft (interestingly, they admitted to not having read the book).  This turned out to be the first of many such incidents around the United States.

My piece plays with the various meanings of “recover”—i.e. to cover again, to regain possession, even to remove or extract (as, say, from a fire).

A de-acquisitioned library copy of The Goblet of Fire became the genesis of the sculpture.  I created a new dust jacket for this book from matches and deconstructed matchboxes. Harry Potter—part of the illustration from the original dustjacket—peers out from his bunker, under siege, as it were. The new spine (printed on wood) cites the various burning and mutilation incidents around the country. The cross formed by strike pad material and spine symbolizes the paradoxical nature of religion in which creation/destruction co-exist.  Inside the book, I added special pages to carry various quotes and excerpts about censorship that were important to me.    The “recovered” book rises from the ashes of burned books, also copies of The Goblet of Fire.

I wanted the work to embody the incendiary nature of the censorship battle, the fragility of the cultural legacy that books represent, and the ultimately hopeful triumph of books under all threats of censorship.”

Artist: Liz Hager
Title: Harry Potter & The Fires of Ignorance
Medium: Books, matches, wood, strike pad, digital prints; 14 x 14 x 18 inches
Websitehttp://www.lizhager.com/ Bloghttp://venetianred.net/ Twitterhttp://twitter.com/VenetianRedBlog

Irene Pena, San Jose, Costa Rica

Paul Shampine artist art sculpture sculptor“My images  always reflect the different stages, that I’ve gone through in my life.  I’ve gone  from a dark period to a colorful period, which is where I am right now.  My pictures are always a reflection of who I am; an expression of my inner world.  Even though I shoot mostly fashion images, I consider my pictures to be more about capturing emotions & movement.  I am more concerned about capturing people, faces, expressions and sensations, rather than showing clothes.  I am inspired by interesting faces, locations, music, the light at sunset, artists like Francis Bacon, Caravaggio, Rothko.  I usually investigate, design and plan my personal work  for weeks  with an specific concept.  I’m very detailed in terms of selecting lighting, locations and models. Until all of these elements fall into place, I go out and shoot.”

Artist: Irene Pena
Title
: Dosenjungla
Medium: Color Analog Photography
Website: http://www.irenepena.com

Robert Nall, Manhattan Beach, CA

Paul Shampine sculpture sculptor art artist“I am motivated to create art with bold composition, inventive use of color, and often dramatic light.
I am passionate about color and texture and try to bring these attributes to life in my work.  I seem to lean towards simplicity and regular scenes. I am fond of the south west and the western shore.”

Artist: Robert Nall
Title: Storm Station
Medium: Oil on canvas, 18×24
Website: http://bobnall.com

Megan Prince, New York, NY

Paul Shampine sculpture sculptor art artist

“Many aspects of life inspire my work, but my latest body of work has been focused on communication. Current society is engrossed with the instant message; communicating through email, cell phone, and texting. Because many of our daily relationships are built on these instant communications, little room is left for the deeper understanding that comes from communications that are developed through the passage of time. My hope is that the time intensive build-up and accumulation of the materials in my work would point to building longevity in relationships through communication.

Artist: Megan Prince
Title: Spinning Lines
Medium: Installation-string, 168x216x11
Websitehttp://www.megprince.com

Deborah Lambert, Santa Rosa, CAPaul Shampine sculpture sculptor art artis

“First and foremost, I am inspired by the process of art making which in my case is painting.  I am continuously infatuated with the act of painting.  How it feels, smells and looks during the painting process; even the steps leading up to the start of a painting are inspirational.  However, it can be difficult to convey process to a viewer and sometimes nebulous inspirations need concrete ideas to make them more accessible to viewers.  Second to process, my inspirations come from daily observations of the world around me.  I am inspired by complex arrangements of objects or environments wherever I find them.  A source could be anything from the utility poles to wildlife – urban, suburban or exurban landscapes.  I am currently interested in things that divide and unify simultaneously.  The division and unification dynamic creates a fragmented but connected symbiotic state.  For me, this condition is a reflection of the modern world that is overwhelmed with high speed bytes and clips of information.  I create encaustic multi-panel pieces that reflect the highly structured bytes and clips sentiment, while the gestural oil paintings reflect the speed and movement with hints of disorder.”

Artist: Deborah Lambert
Title: Tangential Expressions No 11
Medium: Oil on canvas, 30×40 inches
Website: http://www.deborahlambert.com/

Michelle Hagewood, Baltimore, MD

 

Paul Shampine sculpture sculpture art artist “My work, or rather the act of creating the work has varying starting points of inspiration.  But common among each approach is a desire to understand my (or our) intangible and unseen potentials.  I often write short fiction, attempting to reconstruct memories and place them into the realm of metaphor.  The visual works follow the writing in a non-linear fashion, but I think they are attempts to further construct this alternate reality so that I might understand another facet of my being.

All too frequently, I’ll find that I’ve delved too deeply into the abstract and so I return to the “surface” where I document and collect the objects and spaces of my immediate environment.  I might investigate an artifact of the “real” with a scientific approach, picking it apart until it becomes an abstract world of molecular structures. Alternately, I might completely re-contextualize the object, using it simply as construction material for something else.

Inspiration is an elusive construct, and often I don’t recognize it until the process of making finds its stopping point and the residue of the inspiration is staring me in the face.  Inevitably, the work fails to fulfill the original desire, and this failure is what leads to the next piece, the continuous cycle of trying to “get it.””
Artist: Michelle Hagewood
Title: The Halophile Affair, Part 2
Medium: Acrylic and ink on duralar, 10×10 inches
Website:
http://www.michellehagewood.com

Melissa Mahoney, Santa Barbara, CA

Paul Shampine sculptor sculpture art artist

 

“My inspiration comes from the energy in a experience or a thought. It can be anything from the smells of Thai food, the feel of silk or the weight of heavy, warm evening air. I like to tap into the experience of all the senses. Sometimes I try and translate sound into painting. I see art as an energy transfer, from my mind to the two or three dimensional surface. The artwork then invites the viewer to receive the energy if they choose to.

About this piece: Some 12,000 feet bellow sea level, albino life thrives in otherworldly darkness, feeding off small creatures tucked into volcanic fissures. The powerful sense of hunger, an unquenched drive for survival, is expressed in the painting’s subtle shades of white mixed with gray, olive and ocher.”

Artist: Melissa Mahoney
Title: Unquenchable
Medium: Mixed media, 28x60x1.5 inches
Websitehttp://mahoneyartwork.com