An art attack? Interview with an Artist, cont….

As the interviews continue,  here are some notables from last year:

  • “What I love the most is when someone finds something I didn’t see in my work.  Then I know I’ve done my job.” ~  Peggy Guichu, Phoenix, AZ
  • “I remember sitting at the easel, smelling the paint, and feeling the way it felt on the brush, under my fingers. It was instantaneous – that knowledge that I had found my calling” ~ Jana Ireijo, Solvang, CA
  • “ I was discussing my major options with my father & he said, “Why don’t you major in art?…You have always been creative.” I decided to give it a try. I changed my major to Fine Art & never looked back.”~ Anna Marie Francesco, Upland, CA
  • “My art doesn’t speak to the intellect but to the soul and to the feelings.” ~ Diana Chelaru, Torino, Italy
  • “Daily life is very interesting and fun if we just take the time to look.” ~ Laura Barbosa, New Jersey
  • “…she was reviewing my work on the walls in my studio… after about 20 minutes of looking in silence she turned to me and said “I’m going to buy this one “Weed” and take it with me today. Bring those three (pointing to others on the wall) to the gallery next week and I’ll put you into the next group show”. I practically had a fucking heart attach” ~ Mark Van Wagner, Kauai, HI
  • “…then I realized… I was the only student who had given her breasts (denoted by one W-shaped line). I felt it was completely unfair since I was just being accurate, and tried not to cry – until I got home.” ~ Kara Joslyn, Oakland, CA

Thank you all for taking the time and for opening your inner worlds, making this a one-of-a-kind artist blog.

Thank you. ~Paul Shampine

More to come…

It’s all in the eyes…

A knight has his armor. A monk has his tricivara.  And a craftsman has his tool.

At some point in our lives, we develop a very special relationship with something of the  inanimate that far exceeds our expectations and crosses that invisible but clear, intimate line.  A trusted listener who knows our story because it’s part of it.

Paul ShampineFor me, the New Year marks a decade of an understanding with mine. Trust and sacrifice. A silent partner with battle scars of crime, passion and pain.  And, oh what they have seen, felt and heard.

A mile they say.  Well these border to border boys will spit you out at step one and tell none.
A tone signals the next adventure.  I glance down with clarity and sureness and see the hidden smile.  How?- It’s all in the eyes…

“Art is not…” Interview with an Artist, part 4

“Inspired” by Mr. Sadler’s comments below, I’ve found what others have to say what “art is not…”  I open with my friend Pablo and close with some reality:

Art is not the application of a canon of beauty but what the instinct and the brain can conceive beyond any canon. When we love a woman we don’t start measuring her limbs.” ~ Pablo Picasso

Art is not an investment” – VIDEOArne Glimcher, founder of Pace Gallery.

Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.”  ~ Edgar Degas

One of many collections – daughter Samantha @ 7, now 12 years old

“Start by remembering that teaching children about art is not just about showing them how to recognize a van Gogh or Picasso, it’s about preparing young minds for a future of invaluable experiences—art related or otherwise.” by Andrea Mulder-Slater (http://www.kinderart.com/artspeak/important.shtml)

Art is not a luxury.” Fresh Artists (http://www.freshartists.org), a non profit 501(c)(3) organization, created to help save art making in K-12 public schools.

The interviews continue….
Best, Paul
Paul Shampine

Roger Sadler, Temple TX

I am never inspired. Art is work. And I work. Within the process of work I may get excited about an idea and follow it out. Work and ideas. No inspiration: that is a late 19th early/ 20th century concept. Sorry to contradict you but making art is not magic; and inspiration bespeaks of magic. To conclude, art is work and ideas.

When did you first discover your creative talents? 14 years old.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. Selling The Leaving for 600 dollars was my biggest sell and biggest painting and most dear to me. THE LEAVING is not a horror painting despite appearances. It is about pain. The pain of a relationship breaking up and the child being abandoned, or being left with the clan behind the fence. The male is exiting the front of the picture. He is slumped with grief and depression. The women stays behind with the child, holding her hand. The characters are so depressed and in so much pain that “the flesh is stripped from their bones.” The painting is medium large, 5 ft x 5 ft.

The other painting is PURPLE PAINTING. It is an example of my current painting style. My previous painting style was realististic/impressionistic. My present style is abstract. The size is 16 x 20 inches.

Who are your favorite artists? My present (and they change) favorite artists are Brice Marden and Sean Scully.


Artist: Roger Sadler
Title: The Leaving and Purple Painting
Website: http://www.rogersadler.com/

Ruby Farias, Scottsdale, AZ

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was passionate about art as long as I can remember… I loved doing crafts with my mother as a child. In school, I doodled a lot and in high school I think I took every art class that was available. Although in my adult life I took somewhat of a hiatus to work on my “corporate career”, I came full circle in 2001 and reconnected with my passion. It was then that I promised myself that I would never put my brush down again.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. It was my first piece that I sold to someone I didn’t know. It was my first gallery show and I was thrilled to see the tab on the wall announcing to all that “Lavender Morning” was sold. It felt great and I was so happy that someone out there could love a piece of art that I created. It is a great feeling when the public enjoys my work. I want my work is to provide energy and to brighten up ones soul.

Who are your favorite artists? It is the works that are created with somewhat of an abstract technique, bright colors and details that make you wonder what is going on in that piece that attracts me. Of course, there are works done by familiar artists like Monet, Van Gogh, Kahlo, Klee and Matisse that I truly enjoy; not only in their work but in who they were and what their story was.

Artist: Ruby Farias
Title: Nights Magic
Medium: Acrylic, Gel on Canvas, 16″ X 20″
Website: http://www.rubyfariasdesigns.com

Courtney Jacobs, Pleasanton, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? Drawing was one of my earliest ways to play.  My mom told me that my preschool teacher had contacted her out of concern for my “different” drawings…and for the fact that I spent so much of my time drawing.  Painting didn’t come until waaaay later in my teenage years.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I had a large abstract painting (Big Bang) on display at a local theater event.  At the artist reception I was approached by TWO people who were interested in purchasing the painting.  I was completely ecstatic to be in such “demand”, and ended up selling the painting to the first buyer for over $1000 (big bucks for me at the time).  The buyer still comes to a few of my events each year to check out the progress.

Who are your favorite artists? I have become a big fan of Gerhard Richter.  He is so versatile, working between photo-realistic painting, and completely colorful non-figurative painting.  Jackson Pollock‘s action paintings were also a big inspiration for me.

Artist: Courtney Jacobs
Title: Trummerzackam
Medium: Acrylic on panel, 36×60 inches
Website: http://www.courtneyjanejacobs.com/

Patricia Corbett, Wallingford, CT

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was drawing figures, horses, etc. as a child and would win little awards in grammar school. In high school I was known for my art.  But after high school graduation and 3 years of night school, I went back to college majoring in music applied in voice.  My professional career as a singer was very satisfying. 10 years ago I retired from music and rekindled my art career.  It has been very enjoyable.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I sold my first piece of art at Zoe & Floyd Art Gallery in CT.

Who are your favorite artists? Edgar Alwin Payne, Richard Schmidt, Mary Cassatt, John F. Carlson, and Franz A. Bischoff.

Artist: Patricia Corbett
Title: Summertime on the Merritt
Medium: Oil on canvas
Website: http://www.patriciacorbett.blogspot.com/

Eric Valdez, Alhambra, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? I’ve been creative from as far back as I can remember. My earliest memory of doing anything creative is drawing an Easter bunny at a YMCA after school program when I was 5. From then on I kept drawing, but I never considered it a talent. It was just something I did. I still don’t consider my artistic abilities a talent. They’re more like skills that I’ve been honing for over 25 years.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. The first exhibition that I was ever in kind of set a pretty high benchmark for any other group shows that I’ve been a part of because during the opening I sold both of the pieces that I had submitted. I picked up painting in the early 2000s as a hobby and then stopped when my record collecting hobby took over. Getting back into painting a couple years later was dumb luck and becoming a visual artist was something that I had never set out to do, so it was hard for me to wrap my head around the fact that I had sold two paintings in my first show. Those paintings were done to fit into the theme of the show so I didn’t have a personal connection to them beyond the work that I put into them, but having such strong reactions to pieces that I had painted motivated me to keep going.

Who are your favorite artists? One of my biggest influences is Neal Breton (Google him!), my friend and mentor who dragged me kicking and screaming into his studio and gave me the confidence to show my work off. I also really dig Jean-Michel BasquiatBanksyAndy WarholRoy LichtensteinShepard Fairey, and pop art and street art in general. Comic books also have had a huge influence on me and some of my favorite comic book artists are Frank MillerJack KirbyTim SaleBruce TimmJim Steranko and John Romita, Sr..

Artist: Eric Valdez
Title: Vicente Fernandez
Medium: Vinyl, acrylic, spray paint, 18×24 inches
Website: http://ericvaldezart.com/

 




Don’t talk to strangers! – Interview with an Artist, part 3

“Don’t talk to strangers!”  In American culture, that’s what you typically heard from your parents.  So, when can you start talking to strangers?  Some, well, all of my best friends were strangers and I recently met some really nice
Friendship

strangers that are showcasing some of my sculpture.  Ilsa Svendsen and Joseph Keller own and operate Garden of Ideas, one of New England’s finest nature destinations offering “beyond organic” produce, free range eggs and intimate woodland nature trails where your are guided by unique plant life and equally unique sculpture.

I share the grounds with some creative strangers including Sculptor Stephen Cote and Blacksmith Steven Bronstein. It’s a very special place to visit and to purchase locally grown organic produce from some great strangers: http://www.gardenofideas.com
For those of you that talk to strangers, here are a few great artists to get to know.
Carla Fache, Miami, Fl

Carla FacheWhen did you first discover your creative talents? I think that this is something you are always discovering and is endless. In my case, my first memories of recognizing I could do “magic” with common things, was when I was 5 years old and I discovered that I could use the flower’s petals as color painting and I started painting with them. That’s when the magic started…

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. The name of the painting was “blue sky” and a collector, in my first exhibition, purchased it. The next day, the same collector, came and bought me another painting, the biggest painting I had at that time. That was another of the signs that confirmed me that I was on the right track.

Who are your favorite artists? Salvador Dali,Mark Rothko,Frida Kahlo, Robert Motherwell, Franz Kline,Roberto Matta,Gerard Richter, Joan MiróSéraphine.

Artist: Carla Fache
Title: De amor y de sombras
Medium: Mixed media on wood, 50×50 inches
Website: http://www.carlafache.com/

Amanda Sage, Vienna, Austria

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was always into making things, but it wasn’t till i was 14 and didn’t have any money for xmas presents, so i painted on t-shirts for my family, which was the first time i really played with paint. I had always been into drawing, colored pencils, charcoal, etc… it was so much fun and a friend offered to buy one from me for a present for their father, this let off a light bulb in my head and from then on out I’ve made a living primarily from painting.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. My first real exhibition was at the Gallery at the Ernst Fuchs Museum in Vienna, Austria in 2001. It was a real success because I painted some life size nudes of his daughter and daughter in law who then organized the show, a few hundred people came to the opening. I sold a good amount of work and was told that i had to put a price on everything, but could keep my favorite piece, because selling as much as i could would help support me in producing more. I am so happy i did not sell that ‘one’ piece and is still the only piece that i have never put a price tag on. For some reason that story came up to that question.

Who are your favorite artists? Mati Klarwein, Dorothea Tanning, Banksy, Pietro Annigoni, Werner Tubke, Ernst Fuchs, Salvador Dali, Alex Grey, Rene Margritte, Georgia O’Keefe, Frida Kahlo, Neo Rauch, A Andrew Gonzalez, Mars-1

Artist: Amanda Sage
Title: Sharing Rays
Medium: Acrylic, egg tempera, oil on canvas, 30×40 inches
Website: http://www.amandasage.com

Mark Van Wagner, Kauai, HI

When did you first discover your creative talents? At a very early age…. As soon as the tempera paints were introduced to me in kindergarten I was off and running. Back in New York my mother had some artist friends who entered me into my first group show at the age of five and remember going to the opening.  So, since I can remember, I’ve always loved doing artwork and thankfully my family has always been relatively supportive of it.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. It was going to be my first real pitch to get my artwork into an established and well-respected art gallery in Chicago. I had finally been able to schedule a studio visit with the owner, Nancy Lurie. I had been dreaming of getting into to her gallery for years and was really nervous of the visit. So there she was reviewing my work on the walls in my studio… after about 20 minutes of looking in silence she turned to me and said “I’m going to buy this one “Weed” and take it with me today. Bring those three (pointing to others on the wall) to the gallery next week and I’ll put you into the next group show”. I practically had a fucking heart attach….

Who are your favorite artists? Cézanne, Matisse, Van Gogh, Monet, Klee, Miro, Duchamp, Gorky, Cornell, Rothko, DoveRauschenberg, Johns, Richter, A Tapies Artschwager, Penone, Westerman, Golub, A.Neel, N.Jenny, P.Halley, Tuttle, E.Hopper, Turrell, Twombly, Kiefer, Pollock, T.Friedman and so many more….

Artist: Mark Van Wagner
Title: Drawing From Nowhere #21
Medium: Acrylic and sand on board, 24 x 32 inches
Website: http://markvanwagner.com

Eric Kaepplinger, Chicago, IL

When did you first discover your creative talents? I was probably 6 years old and I watched my dad draw a birthday card for my mom using only the crayons and colored pencils that my younger brothers and I had on hand. It was a forest scene with deer and squirrels, and I was blown away. I guess that’s when I discovered that there was such a thing as creative talent and that was way more important, I think, than discovering my own talent.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. In 3rd grade my friend Robby and I started a little art business, specifically selling caricature drawings of made up people for 15 or 25 cents a piece. I don’t remember exactly what the drawing was but I do recall having to replicate it several times for other customers in class. I think in total we made $3 which was pretty cool, and we bought some baseball cards with our loot.

Who are your favorite artists? Martin Ramirez, Adolf Wolfli, Henry Darger, Joseph Yoakum, Kurt Seligmann, John Himmelfarb, Frederic Remington, Max ErnstOlafur Eliasson.

Artist: Eric Kaepplinger
Title: My Chorizo Dreams
Medium: Digital collage of colored pencil and ink drawings mounted on a Masonite box frame. 30×40 inches
Website: http://erickaepplinger.blogspot.com/


Kristen van Diggelen, San Francisco, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? I have been aware of my creative talents for as long as I can remember, which means a toddler drawing with and eating the heads off my markers.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I don’t really have a selling experience or a sold artwork that stands out amidst the group, however, each time I am utterly honored to sell a piece. It is also very cathartic, allowing me more space and funds to make new work.

Who are your favorite artists? David Friedrich, Sargent, Tiepolo, Julie Heffernan, Bernini, Turner, Vuillard

Artist: Kristen van Diggelen
Title: The Way of Negation (Battlescape #2)
Medium: Oil on canvas, 87×72 inches
Website: http://www.kristenvandiggelen.com



Let the storks fly! – Interview with an Artist, part 2

I’m often asked to personally deliver a sculpture to its new home to help with placement and installation.  For me, it’s always a special experience to be involved in the process.  I can’t say it’s close to bringing one of my daughters home from the hospital, but it has its similarities.

It’s a quiet ride. High alert. Straps are tight.  Roads seem bumpier, traffic faster and driving is very defensive.  A block feels like a mile and 35 mph feels like 65.  The arrival is met with smiles, a bunch of ooooohs and fondling.  Unloading is sacred.  Then the parade.  The band soon fades and the crowd thins.  It’s quiet again and the world spins just a bit differently.

Here are three more deliveries.  So, let the storks fly…

Jana Ireijo, Solvang, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? I always knew I had a gift for drawing and art, but for years it was a hobby, nothing more. It wasn’t until undergraduate school that an art class changed my life. It was Introduction to Oil Painting. I remember sitting at the easel, smelling the paint, and feeling the way it felt on the brush, under my fingers. It was instantaneous – that knowledge that I had found my calling. I knew that I could make that paint do anything I wanted. Years later, time has humbled that ego, but the paint itself never fails. I start mixing it on the palette, and once again time stands still.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I often think of the first painting I sold. I wish I had the name of the guy who bought it, so I could check up on it! It was at an art fair in Chicago. He came back twice to see it, before he finally purchased it. I remember being so flattered, because had a small house which he took great pride in. Every piece of art and furniture had a specific memory or meaning to him. It was a painting of a bulldog I was really attached to, and had a difficult time letting it go. I imagine where it hangs on his living room wall. Does he still love it? Is my painting happy?

Who are your favorite artists? I remember being struck the first time I saw Andrew Wyeth‘s “Christina’s World.” I myself was a teenager, and the sense of isolation was just devastating. I am entranced by the symbolism of Northern Renaissance painters. The artist I most identify with (and wish I could paint like!) is Francis Bacon.

Artist: Jana Ireijo
Title: LOVE ME
Medium: Oil on canvas, 48×48 inches
Website: http://www.janaireijo.com

Anna Marie Francesco, Upland, CA
When did you first discover your creative talents? I was doing my undergraduate studies at Cal Poly Pomona & I could not decide what to declare my major in. I was discussing my major options with my father & he said, “Why don’t you major in art?…You have always been creative.” I decided to give it a try. I changed my major to Fine Art & never looked back.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. One sale I will never forget was to the President of Claremont Graduate University, Dr. Robert Klitgaard. He selected me to be the recipient of the President’s Art Purchase Award & my piece currently hangs in the President’s Mansion.  I was very honored.

Who are your favorite artists? Lee Bontecou, Mark Rothko, Mark Ryden, Barbara Kruger, Joshua Okon, David Amico, Chris Burton, Chuck Close, Frida Kahlo, Jackson Pollock, Jay Defeo, Lynda Benglis, Jimmy Gleason, Damien Hirst, Takashi Murakami, Anish Kapoor, BanksyJohn Baldessari & many many more…..

Artist: Anna Marie Francesco
Title: Untitled
Medium: Joint compound & spray paint on canvas.
Website: http://amfineartsite.com

Sherrie Parenteau, Plainfield, CT

When did you first discover your creative talents? I first discovered that I was an artist when I was about 6 years old my father told my sisters and I to all draw a picture of his truck, he was a cross country truck driver, we did as asked and to his  surprise (and mine) my drawing was quite accurate and highly realistic. I knew then that I was given a gift.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. My most memorable sale was  August 2009.  I  had won a one women show in a regional competition  in Mystic CT. and had invited my collectors. One of the collectors that came brought her family with her. As I was talking with her daughter about a painting that her mother had lent me for the show she mentioned that she thought it was odd that I didn’t mention on the painting label that  the painting was in the collection of Sally Jessy Raphael (the former talk show host) I was astonished that the collector I had meet with may times before was in infamous talk show host. Since then Sally and her husband Karl have been collecting my work and currentlly have 8 of my pieces in their collection.

Who are your favorite artists? My favorite artists include but are not limited to… Manet, Vermeer, Velazquez, Alyssa Monks, Alex KanevskyPaul Fenniak, and Winslow Homer.

Artist: Sherrie Parenteau
Title: The Secret
Medium: Oil on panel, 48×60 inches
Website: http://www.sherrieparenteau.com

Interview with an Artist…part 1

Over the next few weeks, you’ll find internationally diverse artist interviews revealing thoughts on their personal creative discoveries, their intimate and memorable “red dot” stories and their exclusive artist guest list.

Sign up today to get future interviews delivered to your Inbox.  Also, feel free to recommend your favorite artist for a featured interview.

Enjoy ~ Paul

Katrin Jurati, Los Angeles, CA
When did you first discover your creative talents? I remember very distinctly, in first grade, the teacher speaking to someone else about me, as I had the revelation, drawing my bird Hansi in his cage (that the rungs of the cage had to be drawn first, with the bird behind so he appeared within it) while hearing “she’s the best artist in the class.”  I was shocked.  That was the first moment I identified myself as artist.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I hate to say I forgot which piece I sold first.  In Buffalo, I sold out 3 years worth of work, so it’s a bit of a blur.  The connection to each collector, of seeing their collection in their home, was amazing.  Unfortunately, out of that work, I remember the piece that I didn’t sell most, a heavy metal sculpture.  Instead of excepting $3000 I wanted $4000 and ended up putting it in storage and then lugging it to California to collect dust downstairs in the garage.  Probably my favorite sale was at the Anderson Gallery.  The collectors wanted it delivered to South Carolina, and invited me down for a week at the beach.  Precious memory.

Who are your favorite artists? My parents had a Picasso drawing book of nudes you can be sure I studied for years.  He’s still my favorite, loved the museum in Paris.  As a child Vasarely made a great impact on my first Museum visit, later punk, with all it’s emotive expression.  Cave Painting, Indian painting on buckskin, El Greco, Gericault, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Kahlo, Ana Mendieta, Baldessari, Godard, Agnes Varde, Louise Bourgeois, Rothko, Sautin, Goya, William Blake, Henry Darger, Raymond Pettibon, Monet, Eva Hess, Paul Klee, Philip Guston, and Lily Van Der Stokker easily begin the list.  Lately, I’ve been into Vera, the designer.

Artist: Katrin Jurati
Title: Grit in the girl/Puts punk in the pearl
Medium: Ink on silk – each piece (4 total) is 56″ x 6″ inches
Website: http://katrinjurati.com

Kristine Harper,  Copenhagen, Denmark
When did you first discover your creative talents?
It is hard to say exactly when I first discovered my creative talents – but I seriously started experimenting with and investigating my creativity when I was studying art. I have always been fascinated by color; I love how one, with color, can capture emotions and shape mental or physical landscapes.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. Selling art is kind of strange – my paintings are reflections of my thoughts, and thereby very personal. There are always paintings I am more attached to than others, and they are the hardest ones to let go.

Who are your favorite artists? I am very fond of legends in abstract expressionism like Mark Rothko and Jackson Pollock, but also Gerhard Richter and Danish artist Per Kirkeby inspire me.

Artist: Kristine Harper
Title: New beginnings
Medium: Acrylic paint on canvas, 100 x 100 cm/ 39.4 x 39.4 inches
Website: http://kristineharper.sat0ri.com/

Kara Joslyn, Oakland, CA

When did you first discover your creative talents? I think it was before I can remember. My mom tells me that I was drawing and arranging trinkets/objects ever since she can remember. I think I realized I was an artist in second grade, though. The class drew portraits of a different student every week and then the student acting as muse would pick her or his favorite drawing to put up in class until the next round. One week we drew our teacher, Ms. Nielsen. My drawing wasn’t picked, and I couldn’t fathom why – it was my masterpiece – so I asked her why I hadn’t been selected. She told me it was because the drawing was inappropriate. I was confused. I pressed her – why did she think so? She pointed to the bust area of my rendered portrait – then I realized… I was the only student who had given her breasts (denoted by one W-shaped line). I felt it was completely unfair since I was just being accurate, and tried not to cry – until I got home.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I was most excited when I sold a piece to my favorite professor, Linda, and when I sold a dyptich to a Rock Star, Tina from The Bobby Teens.

Who are your favorite artists? David Bowie, Nick Blinko, De Chirico, Kay Sage, Judy Chicago, Vija Celmins, Matisse, klee, Justin Olerud, Travis Wyche, Fritz Lang, Johannes Itten, NagelHunx and his PunxPeter Seville, Ertè, Nellè, Leslie Shows, Laura Owenskandinsky, arthur dove, the ancient greeks, the makers of the venus(es) of villandorf…the list could just continue on.

Artist: Kara Joslyn
Title: Vista Equinox Sunset
Medium: Graphite and acrylic on paper,  22 x 20 inches
Website: http://karajoslyn.com

Sara Joseph, Bangalore, India

When did you first discover your creative talents? When I was 10, my best friend used to sit in class and draw cartoons from newspapers during free hours and I used to see that and wait for her to finish drawing as I wanted to color it. One day she said, “Look , why don’t  you try drawing ?”  I said, “No I can’t draw, I can only color “. But finally, through persistent encouragement I drew Winnie the Pooh from the newspaper. The drawing turned out to be really good, which marked the beginning of art in my life.

For an artist, selling their first piece of work is a memorable moment. Tell us about your first piece or a special piece that was sold. I had sold my first work to a friend of mine.  But the most memorable experience was when I sold a work  during a fair called ‘Chitra Santhe‘ where thousands of artists come together to sell their works here in Bangalore, India every year. It was in 2009 when this man came to my stall and checked a work of mine when I wasn’t there. He came back the 2nd time and asked my friend if the artist was back and I weren’t. Then he came back the third time looking for me to buy my work from me, but again I wasn’t there and he bought the painting when I wasn’t there. I was feeling really bad that this was the first time someone eagerly wanted to meet me and I wasn’t there all the three times he had come. Then finally in the evening while we had to pack up he came with his family to tell me he loved my work and wanted to meet in person to tell me how much he loved it.  I was overwhelmed by his gesture.

Who are your favorite artists? My works are a combination of abstraction and realism. I use an abstract background and I keep the portraits as real as possible. This is to show that it’s not the society that am interested in but the people and what the common man in India is like. I love to do portraits, as faces carry the emotions, of a person.  And in abstraction I use squares in the background which represent society which I used as I was inspired by Piet Mondrian and his representation of colors and geometric forms. My favorite artist in realism or I would say photorealism is Chuck Close. I love the way he uses faces of people or his self portraits in different styles to portray a skill beyond photorealism. The expressions are very neutral but the massive sizes he works on and his technique is amazing. Others, to name a few, that have inspired me are Salvador Dali, Michelangelo, Monet, Jeff Koons, David Kassan, Amrita Shergill and TV Santosh.

Artist: Sara Joseph
Title: Bounded
Medium: Oil and acrylic on canvas
Website: http://paintedpainter.blogspot.com/

Stopping time…

Scientists, land developers, farmers and I battle with Mother Nature.  We all do on some level.

Early on when creating metal sculpture, I attempted to preserve the scrolling texture and the organic feel metal has after forging and forming.  I wanted to protect the clean deep hammer marks, the wrinkle in the bend and the abstract patterns from my 25 pound metal grinder.  It’s a challenge.

Finished steel is the end result of a process.  Even raw off the shelf, it’s still a manufactured product. Rust, once my nemesis, now my friend, is the action of steel regressing to its original natural state.   I don’t think the process can fully be inhibited…especially if you desire a natural “metal” look.  The same really applies to wood as well.  It’s like trying to stop time.

I find great satisfaction in combining stone and metal with my work.  As a result, I’m a rock junkie.  I’m constantly eyeballing stone on country roads, highways, weddings, funerals and backyard barbeques.   On a recent stone hunt, I found a magnificent collection of rock unlike anything I’ve discovered before.  After trekking 10x times my weight in stone, exhausted and trying to put my arms back in their sockets, I found the most beautiful specimen of Mother Earth.  It’s so outrageously breathtaking that it caused me to reflect on an ugly but real phrase….something like “ambition exceeding talent”   No artist’s talent  can compete with Mother Nature.

So, alone this rock stands…for me.  Not to be incorporated in a sculpture or altered in any way.  When my forearms ache from drilling, my back from lifting or when my brain feels bankrupt, it’s my God I talk to, confide in and yes, for a moment, it stops time.

Contemporary Abstract Artist